The Green Man

The Eostar sun, it cuts my eyes
Open to the wind and rain.
All around the Earth breathes deep
I come alive again

I am The Green Man of the woods
The wounded and the broken land
I am the fire in the red stag's eye
The touch of a lover's hand
Of a lover's hand



Oh let me speak, lend me your tongue
To sing the trees and streams
Sing the dark blood of the hills
The moon on gooses wings

I am The Green Man of the woods
The wounded and the broken land
I am the fire in the red stag's eye
The touch of a lover's hand
Of a lover's hand

Oh if you meet me in the fields
Don't you be alarmed
I come to bring you joy
I'll do you no harm



Let us dance beneath the stars
The pale moon in our eyes
And celebrate the mysterious
That keeps us all alive
Keeps us all alive

The time has come for us to rise
From the rocks and thorns
Return now from exile deep
Back where we belong

I am The Green Man of the woods
The thistle and the corn
The spark in every creatures heart
The dancer in the storm

I am The Green Man of the woods
The thistle and the corn
The spark in every creatures heart
The dancer in the storm
The dancer in the storm

Permission given from copyright holder as follows:
"We are happy for you to reprint the lyrics of The Green Man on your web site.
The credits should read written and composed by Martin Donelly,
published by Beann Eadair Music, reproduced by permission of writer and publisher

 

The Green Man is a mysterious, eerie figure depicted mainly in medieval European stonework, believed to represent an ancient vegetation deity. The Green man is nearly always depicted as a "foliate head," that is, a face made of leaves and vines. Sometimes, it appears as a human face peering out from leaves, other times with animal features.

The image of the Green man may have been adapted from Roman decorative stonework, or from Celtic interlace figures. Older versions bear a very close resemblance to Celtic and Norse interlace figures, and often combine plant and animal features. One of the oldest examples was discovered on an Irish obelisk that dates to the third century BCE. This may be the Derg Corra of Celtic myth, the man in the tree.

The name "green man" was coined in the late 1930s. Other names for this figure are Jack in the Green or Jack of the Green.

Many believe the Green man is related to the pre-Christian Celtic deity Cernunnos; others that it is simply an expression of the forces of nature, or even a reminder that we, too, are part of the cycle of life. There is no real evidence linking the images to any particular philosophy, cult, or belief, although the faces are strikingly uniform through time.

The Green man is not a strictly European phenomenon- similar images appear in Asian, Indian, and Arabic architecture and art as well.

Whatever his origin, the Green Man is now an unmistakable mascot of the Neopagan religious movement, where he serves as the embodiment of untamed nature, an emblem of the male principal, and a symbol of fertility and vibrant life energy.