Lughnasadh Recipes

"At every level of manifestation, humor spells freedom in some sense ...
Humor means freedom; this is one of its most distinct characters and virtues ...
The freedom to laugh which moves within the conflicts, doubts and tensions of life ...
becomes the freedom to laugh on the other side of enlightenment.
[They] who are no longer in bondage to desire, to the self, to the law ...
[they] who are no longer torn apart by alienation and anxiety
and who are no longer determined and defined primarily by seriousness
can now laugh with the laughter of children and great sages."

Conrad Hyers, in his book Zen and the Comic Spirit

 

Pumpkin Marble Cheesecake

1 1/2 c Gingersnap Crumbs
1/2 c Finely Chopped Pecans
1/3 c Margarine, Melted
16 oz Cream Cheese, Softened
3/4 c Sugar
1 t Vanilla
3 ea Eggs
1 c Canned Pumpkin
3/4 t Cinnamon
1/4 t Ground Nutmeg

Combine crumbs, pecans and margarine; press onto bottom and 1 1/2-inches up sides of 9-inch springform pan. Bake at 350 degrees F., 10 minutes. Combine cream cheese, 1/2 c sugar and vanilla, mixing at medium speed on electric mixer until well blended. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Reserve 1 c batter, chill. Add remaining sugar, pumpkin and spices to remaining batter; mix well. Alternately layer pumpkin and cream cheese batters over crust. Cut through batters with knife several times for marble effect. Bake at 350 degrees F., 55 minutes. Loosen cake from rim of pan; cool before removing rim of pan. Chill. Servings: 10

From MistWraith: http://www.stormfront.org/archive/t-41740.html

 

Pumpkin Cider Bread

2 cups of canned pumpkin
2 cups of flour, and then enough to keep the consistency just right
2 tblspns dry yeast in 1/2 cup of 110 degree water
1 tblspn salt
2 tblspns vegetable oil
1/3 to 1/2 cup molasses
2 cups of fresh cider

Start with two cups of flour, then slowly sift in more after wet ingredients are added. After the flour and salt are combined, mix in the rest of the ingredients from wettest to most solid (cider, then yeast mix, and so on).

Once mixed, pour the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover it with a cloth or plastic wrap, and let it in rise until it’s doubled in size in a warm place. (Generally, this takes from half an hour to an hour). Punch down the doubled dough. Roll the dough out into a long, thin, relatively narrow strip and roll from one end. Place in a greased pan (probably circular in this case), and let rise until doubled again.

Baking bread is not for the impatient! Finally, put it in a preheated oven at about 400 degrees F for about 50-60 minutes. If it looks like it’s browning too quickly turn the temp down a notch or two. You’ll know it’s done when tyou can poke it with a fork and the fork comes out clean. If the fork has some dough on it, let it bake a little longer.

From MistWraith: http://www.stormfront.org/archive/t-41740.html

 

Elder Flower Fritters

     

Fritters are a nice variation on pancakes, and the bonus for this particular recipe is that they are sweet without any additions, requiring no syrup, sugar or jam. Many people have had fritters of various types, especially the popular apple variety. But . . . "elder flower" fritters? Yes, these actually contain elder flowers!

Flowers were a common ingredient in cooking during medieval times, which is where this recipe comes from (England, specifically). In this recipe's case, the flowers mixed into the batter help add a kick and a minty taste.

Because of the elder flowers, these sweeties have been associated with faeries in folk myths. Because of that, they have been used at Pagan celebrations of Beltane, Litha, and Lughnasadh to help as a protection against the malevolent and mischievous fair folk, and sometimes these are even made at Samhain season as a symbol of keeping away bad spirits.

If you've never made a recipe incorporating flowers before, you might start with this one--you'll be pleasantly surprised! (Read on after the directions for variations and notes.)

Ingredients:
1 egg
1 teaspoon rose water
1/2 cup honey
2 tablespoons brandy
1 cup self-rising flour
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
2 cups elder flowers, freshly picked and cleaned

Mix egg, rose water, honey, and brandy in a bowl, then stir in flour and cinnamon. Should be thick like pancake batter. (Add flour if it's too thin, and add more brandy if it's too thick.) Fold in the flowers. Fry like pancakes, OR drop by the teaspoonful into a deep-fat fryer until golden brown. Serve with orange water sprinkle and fresh lemon, or dip in sweet cream.

Yield: Fried like pancakes: About 10. Deep fat fryer: About 2 dozen.

Source: Paraphrased from Telesco, A Kitchen Witch's Cookbook

Use for: Beltane, Litha, Lughnasadh, Samhain

Note: In many areas it may be tough to find fresh elder flowers. I myself made this recipe with dried elder flowers ordered from Living Earth Herbs. It still tasted fine. If you order from somewhere or pick them yourself, make sure they are the Nigra variety because there is a kind you shouldn't use due to high toxicity.

IF YOU CANNOT FIND ELDER FLOWERS or you are squeamish about eating flowers, there is a variation:

You can make this recipe by substituting very finely diced apples--about a cup's worth--for the flowers, and adding a little fresh mint. If you do this substitution I urge you to not neglect the mint, because with either elder flowers or with apple-and-mint, the minty taste is really what makes it so good.

From Swankivy: http://tinyurl.com/33kl3k